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Niven
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Joined: 06 Aug 2009
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Posted: 06 Aug 2009 Topic: Alytes obstetricans



Where would I find reliable and up to date information on the U.K. geographic distribution of Alytes obstetricans (Midwife toad)?

Conservation status is also of interest.  I have found a population in Mid Wales.

Internet references prefered.

Thankyou,

NVN.




Niven
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Joined: 06 Aug 2009
No. of posts: 4


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Posted: 07 Aug 2009 Topic: Alytes obstetricans



Dear Caleb,

I didn't realise Alytes obstetricans was an introduced species.  I have strong childhood memories of references in field guides (maybe refering to european species).  How long ago was it introduced?

I Found a specimen two days ago at a plant nursery which has patches of wet marshy ground (Just south of Llandrindod Wells).   To the West of the site are feilds used for raising sheep and the Eastern boundary is bordered by a small wooded area, this containing the banks of a fast flowing stream.  This stream runs parallel to the adjacent North/South railway line which in turn runs parallel to the "A" road beyond.

I am fairly certain now that I had been unwittingly hearing the toad's vocal calls for some time.  I was very curious about this unfamiliar high pitched hooting sound.  This call was reminisent of tree frogs etc that I have heard abroad and I remember commenting at the time, "If I didn't know better I'd say that was some kind of exotic frog's call". The sound was kind of directionless and, unable to locate the origin, I dismissed it as the call of an unfamiliar bird.

Anyway, I was subsequently excited to happen across an individual and immediately recognised that it was neither a common frog nor common toad.  Thinking it to be a rare native species I didn't poke it around too much so didn't get a view of it's ventral surface (no labia were apparent but as I said I didn't examine it closely).  It had frog-like facial features the snout being much more pointed than any toad I have seen but it's entire dorsal surface had a warty appearance. 

I have got photographs in the pipeline (I used a 20p coin for scale) but the animal was stressed during photography so the pictures were very rushed and taken on a camera without proper macro facility (I felt it important to release the toad where I found it immediately).

The toad was found inside a polytunnel and the nursery in which it was found lies at the Northern boundary of a village called Howey, this site being immediately adjacent to the A483 and on the West side of the road.

I have no idea of the origin of the animals, have you any suggestions as to how I may find out?




Niven
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Joined: 06 Aug 2009
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Posted: 07 Aug 2009 Topic: Alytes obstetricans



Oki dokey. Will attempt to post them on this site when they are available.  Clues on the necessary technique for posting pix would be useful.  Otherwise I could just attach them to an appropriate e-mail.

Directions please.

Thank you very much for your comprehensive assistance.

NVN




Niven
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Joined: 06 Aug 2009
No. of posts: 4


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Posted: 09 Aug 2009 Topic: Alytes obstetricans



Dear Chris,

On reflection it may be best for me to e-mail all of them to you and then you can make an executive decision on their worth, maybe just publishing what you consider to be the best one.

I haven't seen them yet but I have been informed that they have now been transposed to disc.......I am awaiting delivery.

Being a newcomer to this site and the internet in general I am struggling to find the appropriate e-mail address, I would be gratefull if you would furnish me with the complete address you indicate.

Many thanks,

Niven.

Lapsed zoologist.




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