RAUK - Archived Forum - noisy amphibian

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noisy amphibian:

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GuyAndMarg
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Joined: 28 Apr 2010
No. of posts: 1


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Posted: 28 Apr 2010
We recently moved to Capel in Surrey, never lived somewhere with so many ponds and ditches. Tonight, we investigated the calls from the village pond, they were so loud. A very rapid "raok, raok, raok." As we approached they dived into the water and went quiet of course. Any ideas what they are?

PS My girlfriend is from the north and never seen a slow worm before. Now she's seen two in a week! I was quite surprised, thought they were fairly common all over the UK.

will
Senior Member
Joined: 27 Feb 2007
No. of posts: 330


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Posted: 29 Apr 2010

Hi

They'll be some kind of marsh and/or edible frog population, which are spreading in the UK, following various escapes and introductions.  They're your classic continental frog, with a pair of 'bubblegum' vocal sacs, that enable them to produce a racket.  It is said that the French Revolution was caused in part by the peasants revolting against the duty of thrashing the water of local ponds with brooms, to stop the frogs calling at night and hence disturbing the sleep of the aristocracy.  They'll keep calling throughout the spring and sporadically through the summer too, I'm afraid.  You'll find more about them in the ID section here or go to the Surrey Amphibian and Reptile Group website too.

Cheers

Will


herpetologic2
Senior Member
Joined: 15 Jun 2004
No. of posts: 1369


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Posted: 29 Jun 2010
None of the reptiles can be considered as 'common' even
down here in the south they can be numerous in places but
the majority of the UK does not have reptiles.

In Manchester I know that ARGSL has been looking for
slowworms as they are much rarer than down south like


J
Vice Chair of ARG UK - self employed consultant -
visit ARG UK & Alresford Wildlife
herpetologic2
Senior Member
Joined: 15 Jun 2004
No. of posts: 1369


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Posted: 29 Jun 2010
Though keep an ear out for any deep sounding calls - like a
cow's moo - as there are potentially bullfrogs around!


j
Vice Chair of ARG UK - self employed consultant -
visit ARG UK & Alresford Wildlife
Caleb
Forum Coordinator
Joined: 17 Feb 2003
No. of posts: 448


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Posted: 30 Jun 2010
[QUOTE=herpetologic2]
the majority of the UK does not have reptiles.[/QUOTE]

Not sure exactly what you mean by this- slow-worms, common lizard and adder are present in pretty much every county of mainland Britain. And yes, they're all numerous in certain hotspots in the north, just like in the south.
herpetologic2
Senior Member
Joined: 15 Jun 2004
No. of posts: 1369


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Posted: 30 Jun 2010
Okay maybe this would be a better phrase

The majority of the UK countryside does not have reptiles
- i.e. the majority of the land is unsuitable for
reptiles - only a very small proportion of the land is
suitable and is utilised by reptiles

An observation made way back in 1911 or 1913 - in
relation to the common lizard being not found in the
majority of the Countryside - this was quoted in Beebee
& Griffiths 2000

J


Vice Chair of ARG UK - self employed consultant -
visit ARG UK & Alresford Wildlife
will
Senior Member
Joined: 27 Feb 2007
No. of posts: 330


View other posts by will
Posted: 30 Jun 2010
How about using the phrase 'widespread and locally common' for reptiles like slowworms?  might even still apply to adders (at least in some coastal areas etc) though sadly less so than previously.

- noisy amphibian

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