RAUK - Archived Forum - What type of newt?

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What type of newt?:

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b9gardener
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Joined: 13 Aug 2010
No. of posts: 3


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Posted: 13 Aug 2010

Topic must be raised all the time, but I can't find an answer. Could anyone please identify these newts please. Came across them whilst gardening. Found 11 altogether in a small culvert


tim hamlett
Senior Member
Joined: 17 Dec 2006
No. of posts: 572


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Posted: 13 Aug 2010

hi

they are great crested newts. they are subject to pretty strict potective legislation and you're not really supposed to handle them without a license so you're better off letting them go where you found them asap. their habitat is also protected so again you should try not to disturb them or their envionment once you've released them.

 

cheers

tim


Donny
Senior Member
Joined: 11 May 2004
No. of posts: 53


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Posted: 13 Aug 2010
Oops, beaten to the punch!



The Great Crested Newt


The Great Crested Newt is an endangered species and
protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

It is an offence to disturb these newts in any way

Kill, harm or injure them

Cause damage to their habitat

Possess, sell or trade them in any way


http://www.herpetofauna.co.uk/great_crested_newt.htm
Donny40403.6268055556
b9gardener
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Joined: 13 Aug 2010
No. of posts: 3


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Posted: 14 Aug 2010

Hello Tim Hallett and Donny. At last I've had somebody recognise the newts - been trying for ages now. 

I was digging out a culvert next to an ornamental pond and uncovered them - very lucky I didn't have an accident with them! Don't worry, they have been returned to where they were found.

I'm so glad that my mother has these in her garden - she also has a dewpond with numerous species of newts.

Is there anything I can do to ensure that they and their habitat is protected for the future, and anything I can do now in the short term to ensure they are well looked after and breed successfully.

Once again - many thanks and look forward to hearing from you.


will
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Joined: 27 Feb 2007
No. of posts: 330


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Posted: 14 Aug 2010
Hi there

Congratulations on having great crested newts and especially on your enthusiasm at being told what they are!  Crested newts can thrive in large gardens with large garden ponds, without too much specific attention (in fact they can thrive on benevolent neglect) but the main thing to bear in mind is that crested newts and fish do not mix.  The newt tadpoles hang in the open water and are efficiently predated by most fish, especially sticklebacks, perch etc.  You can find crested newts in ponds which are thinly stocked with cyprinids (goldfish and carp etc) but they'll really thrive in fishless ponds.  As far as terrestrial habitat goes, some rough grass, logpiles, etc are good for food and cover, but they'll happily hide under paving slabs and in crevices in stone walls etc in more formal gardens.
Cheers

Will

b9gardener
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Joined: 13 Aug 2010
No. of posts: 3


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Posted: 14 Aug 2010

Hello Will,

Many thanks for the info - much appreciated.

My mum has a large garden with a dewpond at one end, it usually dries out end of Aug begining Sep, so I assume the newts will move into the garden. I have been helping her with the garden and developed a wild area with logs etc for the newts and frogs. The dewpond doesn't have fish in it.

Do I need to register the location of the great crested newts with anyone?


AGILIS
Senior Member
Joined: 27 Feb 2007
No. of posts: 694


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Posted: 14 Aug 2010
oowarrr looks like a warty newt boy
   LOCAL ICYNICAL CELTIC ECO WARRIOR AND FAILED DRUID
will
Senior Member
Joined: 27 Feb 2007
No. of posts: 330


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Posted: 14 Aug 2010
Hi again

It's great for the newts that the pond dries out at the back end of summer / early autumn - this permits the newt larvae to metamorphose and become independent of the water, and of course will prevent fish from colonising the pond.

I'm sure your local wildlife trust and county Amphibian and Reptile Group would be pleased to get the details of your site - you can find links on the rauk homepage

Cheers

Will

- What type of newt?

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