RAUK - Archived Forum - Yellow Indian frog

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Yellow Indian frog:

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Loppylugs
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Joined: 27 Nov 2005
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Posted: 27 Nov 2005

Hi

I'm new to the list. I appreciate that this is a UK-based site but can anyone identify these amphbians, which I saw in their hundreds in India on a recent trip, please? The females were about 10cm. They were all very loud singers! Thanks. Loppylugs

 

 

 

 


herpetologic2
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Posted: 27 Nov 2005

 

Well they look alot like Water Frogs which are found all over Europe - the stripe is like what is found in introduced water frogs in the UK - there are many different species which are identified in Europe - I would imagine that these would be a 'water frog' species - an Indian species? The water frogs are much more aquatic than our native frog which belongs to the Brown Frogs - while the other species are also called green frogs - the pointed noses on those do suggest a Marsh type the colour is also very interesting - any other people could put a species name to these frogs?

Regards

 

JC


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Loppylugs
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

Hi there

Thanks for your quick response. Yes, it certainly looks like a more aquatically inclined amphibian although, since it was obviously breeding at the time, it would be hard to say. I have looked all over the place for a similar picture to help me identify the species but have found nothing - it's the yellowness of them that was so striking - could this be a 'mating special' look ? Below is another picture of a lone male. The females were a bit less gaudy! Cheers, Loppylugs.

 

 

 

 


herpetologic2
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

Snap! - here is a picture of a water frog from Kempton Park Race course - your Indian frogs have a more pointed nose - but there are similarities - the colour in your frogs may be due to breeding


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herpetologic2
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

 

I have found a pointed head Frog Rana alticola which is found in India through to Thailand - cant find a picture of this frog though - but its Indian common name does fit the bill

 

Regards

JC


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herpetologic2
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

 

Definitely a Water Frog Species

JC


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Caleb
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Joined: 17 Feb 2003
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005
Is it not the Indian Bullfrog (Hoplobatrachus tigerinus, was Rana tigerinus or Rana tigrina)? I think I've read that breeding males are yellow in this species.
Caleb38684.2086921296
Loppylugs
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

Hi

Caleb has it, I think. Here's a pic I found after Googling his suggestion. I'm pretty sure it IS the Indian Bullfrog. Thank you so much for sorting this out. I took so many pictures of wild life throughout India, including various amphibians and reptiles. I managed to identify most creatures but these had me stumped and they were so breathtaking to see in all their singing glory, which I recorded with the photos I took - it was quite something. Thanks again! LL

 

 

 


herpetologic2
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

 

What sound were they making? was a heavy slow croak (cow like) or was it a laughing? Where were the vocal sacs were they under the chin or were they paired vocal sacs?

JC

 


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herpetologic2
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

 

What colour were they?


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Loppylugs
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

Hi JC

I know it sounds a bit tame but I can't remember the sound off the top of my head. When I get home tonight I'll find the appropriate sound file and have a listen. I think it was a loud, deep 'greedep', a bit like a spring being wound up so, probably more of a croak than a laugh!

As for the vocal sacs, to be honest I didn't notice any. It's difficult to explain but I was one of 17 travellers on an overland truck. The fact that the driver stopped at all for me to look at these frogs was surprising enough - hence I didn't have that long and didn't take in all the details, just took the photos and made a quick sound recording, sorry. Thanks for your interest.

Cheers, LL

 


David Bird
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005
I have attached a photograph from the Amphibians of Sri Lanka but photo taken in India. The description says bright yellow at courtship and mating.


David
British Herpetological Society Librarian and member of B.H.S Conservation Committee. Self employed Herpetological Consultant and Field Worker.
Loppylugs
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Posted: 28 Nov 2005

Hi

Thank you for the photo - what a great list this is, so helpful and pleasant. I guess this would be the 'one' then as suggested. I don't imagine, given their proximity to one another, that the wildlife in Sri Lanka (where I was born incidentally, but irrelevantly) and India are much different. Since it was clearly mating and courtship that we witnessed this would explain the lovely vibrant yellow colour of the males. Thanks again.

It was a great trip and I saw lots of other animals that might raise the pulse on this list including monitor lizards, python, agamas and more frogs and toads than you can shake a stick at.. here's three reptiles...

 

 

 

 


lalchitri
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Joined: 06 Jun 2006
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Posted: 07 Jun 2006
i came across something similar in india also.
the frog i saw was much bigger than 10cm though, roughly about 25-30cm.
it was lying at the edge of a village pond in the sun.
i remember visiting india whilst a young lad, and seeing frogs everywhere.
i have rarely seen many on more recent trips though.
this is probably due to the over use of insecticides on crops.
a lot of other wildlife seems to be dwindling there also - bats, lizards, insects, vultures, etc
however i visited my in-laws house there during late september.
this is the time of year when rice is planted and grown in fields.
the house i was staying in was full of little toadlets jumping around the bedrooms, living rooms and kitchen.
no-one seemed to think anything of it though.

lalchitri38875.5604398148
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lalchitri
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Posted: 26 Oct 2006
a friend of mine in india took these interesting pics and sent them to me





Reformed Teetotaller

- Yellow Indian frog

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