RAUK - Archived Forum - Uninvited frog

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Uninvited frog:

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Lavven NZ
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Joined: 30 Jan 2006
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Posted: 30 Jan 2006
We were delighted to find many tadpoles in our large pond, so transferred about 30 to a large container closer to the house, where we could watch them develop.  Some managed to make the change to little frogs.  But a large 'rogue' frog has appeared and there don't appear to be any more tadpoles.  Is it likely that he has eaten them. We can pat the frog, though honestly I feel more like wringing his neck!!! Can someone confirm if it is likely that the rogue has got rather large due to the onsite food supply.
Dan Kane
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006

It may have, but it's unlikely that eating tadpoles will have greatly increased it's size.

It may just be an abnormally large frog, what kind is it?


Dan

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djp_phillips
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006
frogs do sometimes eat their own species in a smaller form, maybe the
tadpoles are hiding, although they are most likley to have been eaten
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Dan Kane
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006
Most of the tadpoles in our pond last year went into the field behind our house, although some suffered the wrath of my dad's lawnmower, as hundreds were hiding in the grass.
Dan

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djp_phillips
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006
you mean small juvenile frogs, not tadpoles
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Dan Kane
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006
yes, yes, about 1cm long, small and dark brown, speckled with little flecks of creamy white.
Dan

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djp_phillips
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006
yes, nice, but too small for me, i hate to think how many i kill nt even
knowing they are there   
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Dan Kane
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006
We had to go through for hours looking for the little chaps, trying not to step on them as we went...
Dan

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djp_phillips
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006
thye just get in the way, nothing much you can do except hope
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Dan Kane
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006

Like that snail on the advert, the one where the woman scrapes the car, and spills red wine on the sofa...

Stupid girl...


Dan

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djp_phillips
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006
I didn't see that one
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Lavven NZ
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Posted: 31 Jan 2006

thanks for the reply.  I will encourage the FROG to seek sustance elswhere and restock the pond, then put a net over the top in an endeavour to safeguard the wee ones.

Here is a photo of the univited frog in our New Zealand garden.


Dan Kane
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Posted: 01 Feb 2006

I'm not sure what kind of frog that is, but i'm sure that netting will keep it out.

Last year in an effort to protect her strawberrys my mum put netting over them, and managed to unwillingly catch Common Toads and a few unsuspecting Sparrows...

Dan Kane38751.6447337963
Dan

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Dan Kane
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Posted: 01 Feb 2006
They were all released though... no worse for wear...
Dan

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djp_phillips
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Posted: 01 Feb 2006
That's a nice frog, do you know what species is could be?
The netting will help, but be careful about not netting any snakes,
although I don't think there are any on New Zealand...
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lalchitri
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Joined: 06 Jun 2006
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View other posts by lalchitri
Posted: 05 Sep 2006
[QUOTE=Dan Kane]Most of the tadpoles in our pond last year went into the field behind our house, although some suffered the wrath of my dad's lawnmower, as hundreds were hiding in the grass.[/QUOTE]


do lawnmowers really kill froglets?
my dad also seems to value his lawn more than my froglets, though i thought most of them jumped out of the way (but the number of froglets has gone down since last weeks mowing).
newts seem to be less agile so wouldn't they be affected more?

i have bought a pond light for my pond.
i thought the light it emits at night would attract insects for food.
does anyone else have any experiences with these?

Reformed Teetotaller
Dan Kane
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Posted: 05 Sep 2006

Yeh, they'd get caught on the blades and cut up between the blades and the base plate (the part that the grass is trapped between so the blades can cut it).

I think the newts would be less agile with their tails, but that dosen't matter in my case - either they're picked up and released in the garden, or they're unfortunate

The froglets don't seem to be jumping out of the way on my lawn, even when they're picked up to be relocated to a nice part in the garden, but i dont cut the grass, my dad does...

The pond light looks O.K., but im not too sure about it attracting airborne insects, and its only the small froglets that will eat in the water, adults and juveniles only eat on land, but i don't know about the newts and efts - i recon they'll eat in the water as they spend much of their time in there.

Hope this helps

Dan


Dan

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Suzi
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Joined: 06 Apr 2005
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Posted: 05 Sep 2006

Lalchitri I don't think you need worry too much about mower victims. I've got a large garden with lots of lawn and also lots of frogs and some toads. I've never run over any but that's probably because I think you'll find they are rarely sitting out on the open lawn but rather lurking under or in vegetation.

With regards to pond lights I tend to go with natural light. I wouldn't want my pond lit at night because some creatures work by night.


Suz
Caleb
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Joined: 17 Feb 2003
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View other posts by Caleb
Posted: 06 Sep 2006
It's been suggested that very regular mowing is the best way to avoid killing froglets/ toadlets, as they're less likely to go onto the lawn if it's kept very short.

I can't actually confirm or deny this, as I've never had a lawn...
Dan Kane
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Posted: 06 Sep 2006

Well, that was the problem, regular mowing(or lack of it)...

Before we went on holiday i put miricale grow/evergreen stuff on it about a week before going away, so when we got back off holiday 2 weeks later it was raining, as it always is in cumbria. 

3 and a bit weeks later, still no let up, so after nearly 2 months in the middle of summer with regular rain and sunshne (sun only when we were away, and for half hour-ish intervals so much as not to dry the lawn sufficient enough for mowing, but enough to encourage growth...) it was nearly 40cm tall.

My dad had to strim about 400m2 of lawn, the mow it haha. The lawn had been a safe haven for the growing frog/toadlets for almost 2 months, but is now kept at a reasonable length, as to try to keep them off it.

With regards to what caleb said about lawn length, i think that short grass would discourage them, as it dosen't provide as much shelter or protection from predators or harsh weather, like we normally have up here, as some bushes or the pond's surrounding vegetation.

Dan


Dan

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- Uninvited frog

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