RAUK - Archived Forum - Marsh Frog Identification

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Marsh Frog Identification :

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GemmaJF
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Joined: 25 Jan 2003
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Posted: 05 Oct 2003

A description and images of the Marsh Frog Rana ridibunda may be found at:

 

http://www.herpetofauna.co.uk/marsh_frog.htm

 

 Lee Alan Fairclough/ONEWILDWORLD LTD 2003

administrator37899.4870717593
Gemma Fairchild, Independent Ecological Consultant
chas
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Joined: 30 Jan 2005
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Posted: 08 Apr 2005

Does anyone out there have any info. on the earliest dates of calling or spawning in the marsh frog -- even approx. (it's to assist some research)?

Many Thanks!

 


Charles Snell
-LAF
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Joined: 03 Apr 2003
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Posted: 02 May 2005
While speaking to a friend from thelincs trust I was given an interesting account about the presence of green frogs at Tophill Low (E. Yorks reservoir, Yorkshire water). A couple of years ago he and Chris Mattison were at the reserve at a bird hide when Chris heard "Marsh Frogs" calling. They saw frogs calling in open water but the range was considerable. Chris was addament that the calls were marsh frogs. A quick trawl on the NBN gateway placed a record of Edible frogs only a few miles from this site. To me this strikes as a likely source of the frogs at Tophill (the area is well linked by drains). So... does anyone know of the historic origins of the edible frogs there? (not far from Hull, the site on NBN looks to be in the area formerly north humberside). I'm basing this on the assumption that the calls of the lessonae, ridibunda, esculenta complex are similar enough to be easily confused as I've only heard marsh frogs.

Regards, Lee.-LAF38474.5668518519
Lee Fairclough
chas
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Joined: 30 Jan 2005
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Posted: 02 May 2005

Lee, the calls are distinct - I expect Chris M. would have given a correct ID. There may be no connection then between the 2 populations.

A marsh frog call can be heard at  http://waterfrogs.csit.fsu.edu/PBhtmls/ridibunda.html#voice

This site has the other water frog calls for comparison


Charles Snell
-LAF
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Joined: 03 Apr 2003
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Posted: 03 May 2005
Thanks for the info Chas. I'll be in that neck of the woods this month so will visit Tophill and keep my ears open.

Regards, Lee.
Lee Fairclough
herpetologic2
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Joined: 15 Jun 2004
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Posted: 08 May 2005

 

Julia Wycherley's papers in The BHS Bulletin and British Wildlife may help

 

Regards

Jon


Vice Chair of ARG UK - self employed consultant -
visit ARG UK & Alresford Wildlife
soberhill
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Joined: 26 May 2005
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Posted: 26 May 2005

Hello

I don't know anything about frogs, although I started to do some research when I heard a very strange noise from the vicinity of our garden pond earlier this week.  I checked in various sources and the sound seemed to be like the recording of a Marsh Frog, but from what I've read, it was not likely in this area (East Yorkshire).

However, I stumbled across this message thread and it mentions TopHill Low Reservoir in East Yorkshire.  That is only a couple of fields away from our property (maybe 1 mile in a straight line).

I have managed to see it (at a distance of about 10 feet) and have a couple of photos, but still don't know what type of frog it is.  If anyone can identify it from the picture, I'd be happy to forward it by email.

[ Incidentally - how long is it likely to keep up this noise !!! ]

Cherryl

 

 

 


Cherryl Smith
Wilfholme, East Yorkshire
soberhill
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Joined: 26 May 2005
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Posted: 21 Jun 2005

Kristi - Thanks for your informative reply, it much appreciated and has been very helpfull with advice as requested.

 

 

 

 


Cherryl Smith
Wilfholme, East Yorkshire
GemmaJF
Admin Group
Joined: 25 Jan 2003
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Posted: 21 Jun 2005

Hi Cheryl,

People often report marsh frogs as a noisey species, mail me the picture using the link 'contact admin' at the top of the page and I'll get an ID for you.

PS Not sure what Kristi's problem is, but I hope they won't bother to rejoin RAUK

GemmaJF38524.4407175926
Gemma Fairchild, Independent Ecological Consultant
Mick
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Joined: 10 Jun 2005
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Posted: 28 Jun 2005
I didn't realise, until recently joining this great site, that Marsh frogs are apparently in water bodies, reservoires, or whatever, around Heathrow airport. Seen as aviation is pretty much my only other big interest, besides wildlife & railways, i wouldn't mind knowing which is possibly the best populated Heathrow site to go & take a little look on my next visit to Heathrow. Is it around about now that Marsh frogs in this country spawn, & if so, about when are they froglets? On Med' holidays i love the noisy racket of frogs such as Marsh frogs. I presume at places like Heathrow they're likely to be in full chorus during this hot weather, are they?  
rhysrkid
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Joined: 14 Nov 2003
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Posted: 29 Jun 2005

Mick

Marsh frog are still calling at the moment at Heathrow but are starting to calm down now, although the recent rain has brought on a new bout of activity today.  There are various sites which we own and manage which support marsh frog but the majority are closed access.  However there is one site in particular where they are common and which is open to the public.  The site is called Two Bridges Farm Conservation Site and is located off Hatton Rd where the road crosses the twin rivers.  On site there is a well established old farm pond which has good numbers of MF.  Also this is an excellent site for common toad in the spring.  Happy hunting!


Rhys
Mick
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Joined: 10 Jun 2005
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Posted: 29 Jun 2005
Thanks rhysrkid, i'll maybe check that accessible site out when i next - hopefully soon - nip down to Heathrow. I presume that would be about the closest site to me here in Banbury, north oxfordshire? Anyway, i look forward to that.
Martingr
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Joined: 13 Jun 2006
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Posted: 13 Jun 2006
I have just picked up on this site. It follows our finding of Marsh Frogs at a couple of ponds near us. We found them last year and again this year. During the past year the frogs seem to have moved  about  1km to take up residence in the new site which is about 50 m from our house. We think this is a genuine new record for this nearby pond because we watch this pond closely and would have heard the frogs in previous years if they had been present. We are in south Worcestershire close to the border with Gloucestershire. My questions are:
1. How rapidly do marsh frogs spread? Would a 1km jump between ponds in a year be typical?
2. Is there a current UK distrubution map for this species? the forum articles mention sites in south east England and Yorkshire but are there any other records for the West Midlands?

Caleb
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Joined: 17 Feb 2003
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Posted: 13 Jun 2006
The NBN map for marsh frog does show one record for Worcestershire...
Martingr
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Posted: 13 Jun 2006
Many thanks for the distribution information. We are in SP03 and a look at the map showing a single 10km square conatining Marsh Frogs in the west Midlands seems to show a site that is north and possibly east of us.
Martingr
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Joined: 13 Jun 2006
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Posted: 13 Jun 2006
I have tracked down the Worcestershire marsh frog record to a site about 30 km north west of our location in SP03 . So  what is the status of my new record? How do I get it into an official data base?
Caleb
Forum Coordinator
Joined: 17 Feb 2003
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Posted: 14 Jun 2006
Best way would be to contact your local herp recorder- details will be here:

http://www.arg-uk.org.uk/contacts.htm

Matt Harris
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Joined: 03 Jun 2003
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Posted: 29 Jun 2006
Marsh? frogs heard calling in Somerset south of the Mendips just west of Glastonbury. Large numbers heard calling and heads seen bobbing up on 31st May this year. Are there any other records of marsh/edible frogs in this general area? (none show up on NBN)

Matt
Gwent Amphibian and Reptile Group (GARG)
Caleb
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Joined: 17 Feb 2003
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Posted: 29 Jun 2006
I was sent a photo of a marsh/edible frog from Wells a couple of years ago.

I think the Herpetological Journal paper on distinguishing species by their calls mentioned a colony in the Somerset Levels.
lalchitri
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Joined: 06 Jun 2006
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Posted: 13 Aug 2006
[QUOTE=rhysrkid]

Mick

Marsh frog are still calling at the moment at Heathrow but are starting to calm down now, although the recent rain has brought on a new bout of activity today.  There are various sites which we own and manage which support marsh frog but the majority are closed access.  However there is one site in particular where they are common and which is open to the public.  The site is called Two Bridges Farm Conservation Site and is located off Hatton Rd where the road crosses the twin rivers.  On site there is a well established old farm pond which has good numbers of MF.  Also this is an excellent site for common toad in the spring.  Happy hunting!

[/QUOTE]


visited that pond today, as its local to me.
sad to say it was completely dried up with no signs of life at all.
previously visited it in may, when MF's and newts were present in good numbers.
same goes for a large pond in uxbribge which has a good population of CF's, toads and GCN's - when i was there last week it was also as dry as a bone.

lalchitri38942.7191782407
Reformed Teetotaller

- Marsh Frog Identification

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