RAUK - Archived Forum - Frog croaks reveal regional bias

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Frog croaks reveal regional bias:

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Ewan
Member
Joined: 14 Jul 2003
No. of posts: 21


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Posted: 14 Nov 2003
Julia Wycherley makes it onto the BBC news web site:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/3270705.stm
Ewan Shilland
Contract Research Scientist
Environmental Change Research Centre
University College London
David Bird
Forum Specialist
Joined: 17 Feb 2003
No. of posts: 515


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Posted: 14 Nov 2003
I have looked at the article and do not really understand some of the information on it. Does anyone know if there is a paper that has been published yet that I have not seen. I thought the British specimens were more closely related to those of Sweeden i.e the Baltic. There is no way I can believe they are closely related to anything from the Balkans where Rana lessonae does not seem to occur ,did they evolve the power of flight or very long back legs to jump over the Alps or is the writer a bit short of geographical knowledge.
British Herpetological Society Librarian and member of B.H.S Conservation Committee. Self employed Herpetological Consultant and Field Worker.
Wolfgang Wuster
Senior Member
Joined: 23 Apr 2003
No. of posts: 326


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Posted: 15 Nov 2003
David,

Neither the Swedish nor the UK population would have survived the ice age in situ, both localities would have been recolonised from a more southern or central European location. The published microsatellite phylogeography does in fact support a southeastern/central European origin for the Scandinavian R. lessonae (Zeisset & Beebee, 2001 - e-mail me for a pdf of the paper). So, UK and Scandinavian populations are each other's closet relatives, but there closest relatives in turn are the eastern European populations (Poland and Hungary were included by Z&B)

Cheers,

Wolfgang
Wolfgang Wüster
School of Biological Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor
http://sbsweb.bangor.ac.uk/~bss166/

- Frog croaks reveal regional bias

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