RAUK - Archived Forum - Ticks on GCNs

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Ticks on GCNs:

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Scale
Senior Member
Joined: 05 Dec 2010
No. of posts: 83


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Posted: 14 Jan 2011
Last summer i found a tick on the neck of a young GCN,
sheltering under a reptile mat. He was clearly infected and
heavily dropsied all over, as if about to burst. I thought
the poison glands would deter such a critter, particularly
around the head and neck area.

Anyone else seen ticks on amphibians?

Cheers
herpvet
Member
Joined: 30 Oct 2006
No. of posts: 30


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Posted: 15 Jan 2011
[QUOTE=Scale]Last summer i found a tick on the neck of a young GCN,
sheltering under a reptile mat. He was clearly infected and
heavily dropsied all over, as if about to burst. I thought
the poison glands would deter such a critter, particularly
around the head and neck area.

Anyone else seen ticks on amphibians?

Cheers[/QUOTE]

Hi,

Can't say I've seen it myself, but they are recorded in the veterinary literature.

Out of interest, did you get any treatment for the newt, and if so what was the outcome?

Bruce.

Bruce Maclean, Bird & Exotic Animal Veterinary Services.
Scale
Senior Member
Joined: 05 Dec 2010
No. of posts: 83


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Posted: 16 Jan 2011
No I didn't but perhaps I should have done. Unless the
animal were maimed and in immediate agony I would tend to
just let nature run its course.

Just out of interest where would a vet stand on treating a
bacterially infected Great Crested Newt?

Rob
herpvet
Member
Joined: 30 Oct 2006
No. of posts: 30


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Posted: 17 Jan 2011
[QUOTE=Scale]No I didn't but perhaps I should have done. Unless the
animal were maimed and in immediate agony I would tend to
just let nature run its course.

Just out of interest where would a vet stand on treating a
bacterially infected Great Crested Newt?

Rob[/QUOTE]

Hi Rob,

I assume you mean legally?

As I understand it, there is a general exemption in the Wildlife & Countryside Act for taking a disabled animal (other than if you disabled it yourself, of course!) for treatment or euthanasia.

There is also a general exemption for many (?all) other animal related acts for animals under veterinary surgeon treatment, e.g. Dangerous Wild Animals Act, although from personal enquiries regarding the DWA act even the lawyers aren't sure about some specific questions.

So, if you took the animal to a vet for treatment, I am confident that there would be no legal problem. In theory, again as I understand it, you would even be able to treat yourself (since amphibians aren't mentioned in the veterinary surgeons act), but I would strongly recommend the vet route, both legally and for the animal's sake. Whether you could continue aftercare at home, the animal being under vet treatment but not direct care, is more questionable (this, with respect to the DWA, was one of the questions DEFRA's lawyers seemed uncertain of).

Anyway, the situation as I understand it.

Hope this helps,

Bruce.

Bruce Maclean, Bird & Exotic Animal Veterinary Services.
Scale
Senior Member
Joined: 05 Dec 2010
No. of posts: 83


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Posted: 01 Feb 2011
I wasn't thinking legally, there is provision enough for
the euthanasia and treatment of crippled GCNs. I was more
under the impression that many vets prefer not to treat a
wild reptile/amphibian (animal).

herpvet
Member
Joined: 30 Oct 2006
No. of posts: 30


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Posted: 02 Feb 2011
[QUOTE=Scale]I wasn't thinking legally, there is provision enough for
the euthanasia and treatment of crippled GCNs. I was more
under the impression that many vets prefer not to treat a
wild reptile/amphibian (animal).
[/QUOTE]

Vet policies will of course vary. but even if unwilling to deal with it themselves the vet should at least be able to give you the contact details for another vet that would be willing to deal with it - obviously vets routinely seeing reptiles and amphibians would be the best place to start, or any wildlife rescue organisation in your area for the vet they use.

May be worth checking on what the practice will do with the animal if brought in - some seem to offer euthanasia only as an option for wildlife. But you should be able to find somewhere willing to try and help injured herps.

best wishes,

Bruce.

Bruce Maclean, Bird & Exotic Animal Veterinary Services.

- Ticks on GCNs

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